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Editor's Note
10.13.2021
Issue 12 Editor's Note

On October 1, Enbridge Energy’s Line 3 began to pump nearly one million barrels of oil per day, putting pristine waterways at risk and breaking federal land treaties with the Anishinaabe people of present day Minnesota. First proposed in 2014, Indigenous Peoples and climate justice activists have stalled its completion for seven years. Their fight continues against the destructive pipeline that has violated Indigenous rights, land, and waters.

Climate Impacts
10.14.2021
Resisting A Fossilized Future: Indigenous People at the Frontlines

The construction of Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline is an example of the fossil fuel industry’s ongoing attack on Tribal rights, Indigenous sovereignty, and all of our climate futures. Indigenous people are leading the fight for our future, and it is long past time to fall in line to follow them.

Critical Analysis
10.13.2021
The Crime of Ecocide: Prosecuting Polluters at the International Criminal Court

International institutions are not structured to account for the environmental catastrophe of neoliberal globalization. The International Criminal Court can alleviate this by making Ecocide a crime under their jurisdiction.

Interview
10.13.2021
A Thin Green Line: An Interview with Benjamin Levy

Recently, we spoke to Ben Levy on his recent efforts concerning the struggle over a proposed liquified natural gas refinery in Tacoma, Washington. Through his involvement in the resistance against this facility, he has witnessed firsthand how imperative it is to keep fossil fuels like natural gas in the ground. Ben sat down with us to explain how this struggle and its geographic location are critical to the climate justice movement.

Editor's Note
9.29.2021
Issue 11 Editor's Note

On September 24, hundreds of thousands of the world’s youth took to the streets across 1,500 cities and towns to voice their frustrations around the lack of urgency around climate change. After a year and a half of grappling with COVID-19, this year’s strike tested whether the CJ movement could maintain its momentum.

Report Summary
9.29.2021
Voting for Climate Justice: America’s Systemic Voter Suppression — A Brief Overview

Voting is one of our most sacred and fundamental rights as citizens. However, this right is under assault — corporate polluters have launched a major attack on American democracy, suppressing the voting rights of targeted populations to hinder the passage of environmental legislation.

Climate Impacts
9.29.2021
Navigating Uncharted Waters: Extreme Weather Events and a Need for Global Climate Justice

Extreme weather events across the globe are becoming both more frequent and more severe. Along with these disasters comes heightened uncertainty, anxiety, and trauma for people living in high-risk regions, and coastline communities are no exception to this rule. The chief culprit? Tropical cyclones.

Interview
9.23.2021
Climate Just Cities: An Interview with Joan Fitzgerald

Joan Fitzgerald is a Professor of Urban and Public Policy at Northeastern University, and her research focuses on urban climate action and strategies for linking it to equity, economic development, and innovation.

Interview
9.27.2021
The Future of the GND: An Interview with Saul Levin

Two and a half years ago, the Federal Green New Deal (GND) resolution ignited interest both nationally and internationally in a bold vision for actually achieving climate and equity.

Interview
9.14.2021
Diversifying Power: An Interview With Jennie Stephens

Dr. Jennie Stephens, Director of the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and the Dean’s Professor of Sustainability Science & Policy at Northeastern University, discusses her research, teaching, and community engagement focus on integrating social justice, feminist, and anti-racist perspectives into climate and energy justice.

Defined
9.14.2021
Intersectionality Defined

What exactly is intersectionality? A term coined in 1989, intersectionality has been used in the climate justice movement to describe the relationships between individuals’ unique identities and experiences, especially those of historically oppressed groups, and how they can influence real and positive systemic change.

Editor's Note
9.14.2021
Issue 10 Editor's Note

A recent case brought before Brazil’s Supreme Court aims to systematically strip ancestral land rights and accelerate agribusiness, mining, and logging activities in Brazil. Ahead of the ruling, the country’s Indigenous tribes came together to coordinate a protest of over 6,000 native representatives against the impending decision—the largest demonstration of Indigenous peoples in Brazil’s history. 

Editor's Note
8.31.2021
Issue 9 Editor's Note

Sixteen years after Hurricane Katrina devastated thousands of families throughout the Gulf, we watch as yet another catastrophic hurricane fueled by climate change makes landfall in Louisiana. 

Review
8.31.2021
5 Climate Justice Podcasts You Need to Follow

For listeners looking to learn more about the many intersections of the climate crisis and the people involved in the climate justice movement, here are five informative and gripping podcasts to plug into. Press play and enjoy!

News Article
9.2.2021
The Toxic Relationship between Oil and the Military

The US military has a long history of fighting wars for natural resources. But with the climate crisis looming, the interdependence between fossil fuel giants and the Pentagon needs to be exposed and broken.

News Article
9.2.2021
The Pyrocene is Upon Us

With climate change and the heating planet, wildfire season has lengthed and worsened over the past few years, leading to a destructive yearly cycle that doesn't seem to have an end. Read more to learn about the latest wildfires, how climate change affects wildfire conditions, and the climate justice implications.

Editor's Note
8.9.2021
Issue 8 Editor's Note

“It is unequivocal that human influence has warmed the atmosphere, ocean and land.” That’s how the 2021 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) landmark climate report begins.

Review
8.18.2021
Food Sovereignty and Indigenous Justice: A Review of Gather

This powerful documentary presents an interconnected story of frontline Indigenous individuals in their journeys to achieve physical, spiritual, and cultural healing from generational-colonial trauma through the food sovereignty movement.

News Article
8.11.2021
Looking Local: Focusing Green New Deal Efforts at the Small Scale for Big Impacts

Many people look to the federal level for climate policy — but local efforts can be even more effective. A city-level GND provides an opportunity to experiment, implement, and achieve progressive policies at the scale closest to the people.

News Article
8.11.2021
The Heat Is On: Climate Change and Extreme Heat Events Threaten the World’s Most Vulnerable

With the last seven years all ranking as the seven hottest years on record, communities around the globe are feeling the heat now more than ever…and it is becoming dramatically worse. By amplifying heat — the deadliest type of weather — to new extremes, climate change has catapulted the world into an era characterized by scorching temperatures of a dangerous degree. Read more to learn about the world’s latest extreme heat events, how climate change has been exacerbating them, and which populations are being disproportionately affected.

Defined
8.9.2021
Globalization Defined

Globalization has been heralded as a way to lift millions around the world out of poverty with the promise of new economic opportunities or Western-style democracy. But there is also a dark side to globalization, and the social and environmental injustices associated with neoliberal globalization are particularly dire.

Review
7.29.2021
Utopian Inspirations and a Green New Deal

Despite our associations with science fiction as magical or imagined, it can be a useful framework to think about solutions to climate change — especially as many of the once-far-fetched, semi-apocalyptic predictions about climate change’s worst impacts are coming true before our eyes.

News Article
7.29.2021
Food Sovereignty for the People: The Ben Linder Solidarity School

Food sovereignty is defined as the right of all people to healthy, culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable means, as well as the right to construct their own food and agricultural systems.

News Article
7.29.2021
The New Normal Around Floods and Climate Change

Two once-in-a-millennium flooding events only a week apart on different sides of the world seem improbable. But climate change is intensifying and making catastrophic floods more common and the impacts more calamitous.

News Article
7.29.2021
Blind to the True Environmental Cost of Crypto

What is cryptocurrency anyways? And how could a virtual currency have real environmental costs?

Editor's Note
7.29.2021
Editor's Note

Climate change is an international crisis. Greenhouse gas emissions have no nationalist sympathies and pollution knows no borders — often affecting most those who have contributed the least to global warming.

Review
7.29.2021
The Heat Wave That Hit the Pacific Northwest

The podcast gives a sobering glimpse into the devastation the heatwave caused, especially in an area unused to such high temperatures.

News Article
7.29.2021
Seven Principles for an Effective Local Green New Deal

Building a GND on fair and just principles is crucial to creating policies that work for local communities and bringing about transformative, systemic change.

Report Summary
7.29.2021
“Hoodwinked in the Hothouse”

Debunking False Solutions to Climate Change. Among these majorly corporate-oriented solutions, the report identifies a common theme: people in power tend to conveniently overlook the reality that these very same types of approaches are responsible for the current climate catastrophe in the first place. 

News Article
7.15.2021
Not So Sweet After All: The True Price of Chocolate

“These companies have a long history of violating the law and participating in a venture in Cote D’Ivoire that relies upon child slaves to produce cheap cocoa.” -IRAdvocates

News Article
7.15.2021
Systemic Land Theft: The Empty Promise of ‘40 Acres and a Mule’

Black farmers have lost billions of dollars in profits from land losses, this unjust theft has become a core driver of poverty and continued socioeconomic suppression of Black America.

Interview
7.15.2021
Celebrating Water Justice: NOLA Water Week

NOLA Water Week, which will be held this November, is the most recent iteration of TWC’s five year tradition of engaging community members around water justice through music, art, ceremony and education.

Review
7.15.2021
Podcast Review: Climate Justice, Y’all!

Climate Justice, Y’all!, hosted by Abigail Franks and Mare’shah Malcom, is an interview-style podcast that aims to highlight environmental justice issues in the Southern United States, a region deeply affected by climate change, yet often left out of climate discussions.

News Article
7.14.2021
It’s Not Just about Switching to Clean Energy: A Just Transition and Why it Matters

The transition to a clean energy economy will require significant changes to how the labor market operates, so it is important for legislators to consider how these changes will affect fossil fuel workers in particular, as well as communities most impacted by polluting industries.

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