"While linking the global South and North, and drawing from a deep well of activist, academic, legal, and regulatory literatures, Pellow interrogates the unequal and deeply racialized relations embedded in the trading and dumping of hazardous wastes in poor communities and communities of color."
Julian AgyemanDepartment of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, Tufts University
Resisting Global Toxics
Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice
David Pellow
,
August 10, 2007

In Resisting Global Toxics, David Naguib Pellow examines this practice and charts the emergence of transnational environmental justice movements to challenge and reverse it. Pellow argues that waste dumping across national boundaries from rich to poor communities is a form of transnational environmental inequality that reflects North/South divisions in a globalized world, and that it must be theorized in the context of race, class, nation, and environment. Building on environmental justice studies, environmental sociology, social movement theory, and race theory, and drawing on his own research, interviews, and participant observations, Pellow investigates the phenomenon of global environmental inequality and considers the work of activists, organizations, and networks resisting it.

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